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COVID-19

DOH Alachua COVID-19

COVID-19 Testing Notice 

The Florida Department of Health in Alachua County is offering COVID-19 testing to those who are currently symptomatic.

Due to high demand, COVID-19 testing at the Alachua County Health Department is by appointment ONLY and exclusively for those who are ill (fever, chills, cough, shortness of breath, fatigue, body aches, headache, new loss of taste or smell, sore throat, congestion, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea). If you have symptoms of COVID-19 and want to be tested, please call (352) 334-8810 to make an appointment.

If you need a COVID-19 test for travel purposes, please call the Alachua County Health Department's Foreign Travel appointment line at (352) 334-7910.

Monoclonal Antibody Therapy Treatments Available Now

Monoclonal Antibody Treatments (MAB) for COVID-19 can prevent severe illness, hospitalization, and death among high-risk individuals. This treatment is available widely in Florida.

Individuals 12 years and older who are high-risk, that have contracted or been exposed to COVID-19, are eligible for this treatment. Treatment is free and vaccination status does not matter. To learn more visit: https://floridahealthcovid19.gov/monoclonal-antibody-therapy/

 

COVID-19 Vaccine Notice 

ALL PERSONS 12 YEARS OF AGE AND OLDER ARE ELIGIBLE TO RECEIVE THE VACCINE IN FLORIDA

PERSONS AGES 12-17: The Pfizer vaccine is authorized for persons age 12 and up. The Moderna and Janssen (Johnson and Johnson) vaccines are authorized for persons age 18 and up. All individuals under the age of 18 receiving a vaccine must be accompanied by a guardian and complete the COVID-19 vaccine screening.

COVID-19 BOOSTER DOSE

If you fall under a category mentioned below, you may visit any site currently offering vaccines for your 3rd dose. For a list of participating retailers please visit: https://floridahealthcovid19.gov/vaccines/vaccine-locator/

This updated interim guidance from CDC allows for millions of Americans who are at highest risk for COVID-19 to receive a Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 booster shot to help increase their production.

The CDC recommends:

  • people 65 years and older and residents in long-term care settings should receive a booster shot of Pfizer-BioNTech's COVID-19 vaccine at least 6 months after their Pfizer-BioNTech primary series,
  • people aged 5-64 years with underlying medical conditions should receive a booster shot of Pfizer-BioNTech's COVID-19 vaccine at least 6 months after their Pfizer-BioNTech primary series,
  • people aged 18-49 years with underlying medical conditions may receive a booster shot of Pfizer-BioNTech's COVID-19 vaccine at least 6 months after their Pfizer-BioNTech primary series, based on their individual benefits and risks, and
  • people aged 18-64 years who are at increased risk for COVID-19 exposure and transmission because of occupational or institutional setting may receive a booster shot of Pfizer-BioNTech's COVID-19 vaccine at least 6 months after their Pfizer-BioNTech primary series, based on their individual benefits and risks.

The agency (CDC) identifies the below list as underlying medical conditions. The list is presented in alphabetical order and not in order of risk.

  • Cancer
  • Chronic kidney disease
  • Chronic lung diseases, including COPD
  • Dementia or other neurological conditions
  • Diabetes (Type 1 or 2)
  • Down Syndrome
  • Heart conditions (such as heart failure, coronary artery disease, cardiomyopathies, or hypertension)
  • HIV infection
  • Immunocompromised state (weakened immune system)
  • Liver Disease
  • Overweight and obesity
  • Pregnancy
  • Sickle cell disease or thalassemia
  • Smoking, current or former
  • Solid organ or blood stem cell transplant
  • Stroke or cerebrovascular disease, which affects blood flow to the brain
  • Substance use disorders

The agency (CDC) identifies the below list as occupations at increased risk for COVID-19 exposure and transmission include front line essential workers and health care workers as previously detailed by the CDC*

  • First responders (healthcare workers, firefighters, police, congregate care staff)
  • Education staff (teachers, support staff, daycare workers)
  • Food and agriculture workers
  • Manufacturing workers
  • Corrections workers
  • U.S. Postal Service workers
  • Public transit workers
  • Grocery store workers

*List could be updated in the future

Information on Children and Teens

While children have been less affected by COVID-19 compared with adults, children can be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 and some children develop severe illness. Children with underlying medical conditions are at increased risk for severe illness compared to children without underlying medical conditions. Current evidence on which underlying medical conditions in children are associated with increased risk is limited. Current evidence suggests that children with medical complexity, with genetic, neurologic, metabolic conditions, or with congenital heart disease can be at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19. Similar to adults, children with obesity, diabetes, asthma or chronic lung disease, sickle cell disease, or immunosuppression can also be at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19. One way to protect the health of children is to ensure that all adults in a household are fully vaccinated against COVID-19.

When can I get a Moderna or J&J COVID-19 vaccine booster?

This is subject to authorization by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and recommendation by CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP). FDA is conducting an independent evaluation to determine the safety and effectiveness of a booster dose of the mRNA vaccines. ACIP will decide whether to issue a booster dose recommendation based on a thorough review of the evidence.

For more information regarding COVID-19 vaccines visit: Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Shot | CDC.

For statewide information regarding COVID-19 please visit: floridahealthcovid19.gov

How to report any side effects after getting your COVID-19 vaccine:

V-safe is a smartphone-based tool that uses text messaging and web surveys to provide personalized health check-ins after you receive a COVID-19 vaccine. Through v-safe, you can quickly tell CDC if you have any side effects after getting a COVID-19 vaccine. Depending on your answers to the web surveys, someone from CDC may call to check on you and get more information.

Note: V-safe cannot schedule COVID-19 vaccination appointments, nor serve as an official record of being vaccinated against COVID-19. V-safe does not provide medical advice. If you have symptoms or health problems that concern you at any time following COVID-19 vaccination, please contact your healthcare provider. In addition, if you have not been able to report your post-vaccination experience in v-safe (because of a missed or expired health check-in), you can also report adverse events after vaccination to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System.

V-safe Information Sheet English

V-safe Information Sheet Spanish